A.D. 70 Dispensationalism: The Postponement Of The Kingdom

If it were not so serious a mistake, one could almost afford to smile at the view that Christ’s coming happened when the temple was destroyed in A.D. 70.  The view is a product of the heavy-handed, stodgy old theology of the post-Reformation period when men were still partly blinded by the dense fogs of…

A.D. 70 Dispensationalism: Paul’s Purpose

Paul’s ministry has two aspects.  First, he preaches the Gospel of the Kingdom to the Jews.  Then, when they reject it he preaches the Gospel of God’s Grace to the Gentiles.  The Gospel of the Grace of God becomes paramount as Israel’s kingdom hope begins to wane.  As the earthly promises sink from sight, the…

A.D. 70 Dispensationalism: The Messengers And Their Mission

From Christ’s ascension into heaven, the Divine stopwatch started ticking. This partly accounts for the extreme urgency noticeable in many of the New Testament writings. In a real sense, the kingdom was “at hand” from the time of John the Baptist’s ministry to the final days of Jewish commonwealth. But we see it start to…

A.D.70 Dispensationalism: The Advent Of The King

John the Baptist had been emphatic in his declarations that he was not the Messiah.  He was merely preparing the way.  His baptistic mission was intended to make Christ manifest to the nation (John 1: 31).  To the Jews, baptism was a proselytical ordinance required by Gentiles before they could come into Judaism.  It signified…

A.D. 70 Dispensationalism: The Forerunner

John The Baptist was the last of the Old Testament prophets.  He was the great herald sent to Israel to prepare them spiritually for the Dispensation that was about to commence.  His ministry was one calculated to level spiritual pride and proclaim the insufficiency of man (Isaiah 40: 3-8).  This leveling was needed, for the…